When healthy eating becomes an obsession: Francesca Mittoni talks about the orthorexia pitfall

Francesca Mittoni told Fanpage.it how she fell into the trap of orthorexia and how she came out of it, recovering a healthy relationship with food and the pleasure of enjoying it without guilt.

Edited by Giusy Dente

Often, even from the best premises, something harmful can arise, if carried to excess and extreme. This is the case with food and sport: a balanced diet and constant physical activity are the keys to a healthy life, they are two ways of loving and caring for yourself. But they can come true obsession: if you go further, you end up inorthorexia🇧🇷 When it comes to eating disorders it is still little considered: but Frances Mittoniwho has already been through this, explained to Fanpage.it what it is about, how he fell into this trap and how he managed to get out of it by finding thebalance between health and weight🇧🇷

what is orthorexia

Like any teenager, Francesca also saw her body change at a certain age. Weight gain around age 16 prompted her to try a diet. Until that moment her relationship with food was completely normal and calm, then something changed and she became conflicted. For a long time she went from restrictive diets to binges, harming herself. “Then I realized the problem and thinking about solving it, I actually fell into a different problem, orthorexia: it’s the obsession with healthy food,” she told Fanpage.it.

Instagram @francescamittoni_
Instagram @francescamittoni_

Orthorexia is still not considered an eating disorder and very little is said about it, not least because from the outside it looks like a balanced and healthy lifestyle practiced by people who are motivated and attentive to their well-being. In fact, Francesca obsessively counted calories, weighed all kinds of food, and refused to go out for fear of not being able to control exactly the quantities and foods. In short, it is a sick relationship: “If a person leads an active lifestyle and eats in a balanced way with serenity, that is one thing, but if they do so fearing any type of diet that differs from the usual , fearing occasions social, so it’s different.”

Instagram @francescamittoni_
Instagram @francescamittoni_

How to have a healthy relationship with food

Francesca on her social media today speaks more serenely about food and nutrition, she continues to offer recipes to her followers, but with a completely different spirit. “At the time, I made purely healthy recipes, low in calories, low in fat, low in sugar. Now I offer balanced dishes, without obsessions, ”she said. Today if he wants a dessert he eats it and the pasta too. He deleted the fear of food, precisely those foods so demonized that it’s almost scary to eat. In short, the current perspective is completely inverted: “The key was shifting focus from the body I wanted to to health: deciding that my health was more important. The body I would have was secondary.”

Instagram @francescamittoni_
Instagram @francescamittoni_

We are slaves to a non-existent perfection

In social networks (and beyond) there is a tendency to flaunt a perfection that most of the time is absolutely fictionalthey propose unattainable and often unhealthy standards🇧🇷 Francesca Mittoni has repeatedly reiterated on her social media that you shouldn’t believe everything you see online. He also explained to Fanpage.it that dealing with certain patterns generates a continuum feeling of frustration: “The physique, especially female, is a fashion and this is mind-boggling. People never feel at ease”.

Instagram @francescamittoni_
Instagram @francescamittoni_

How diet culture affects our lives

“Diet culture is that set of beliefs that divide food into good (healthy) and bad (junk food). This distinction does not exist, because food has no moral value”, said Francesca. Social networks are also involved diet culture has taken over and runs the risk of crushing especially the most fragile, incapable of finding their way around in a world that appears to be homogenized and founded onthin ideal: “Dietary culture sees thinness as an absolute value to which one aspires, sees training as a mere means to burn calories and consequently people are morally characterized based on what they eat, how much they train, how much they weigh, the size they wear “.

Instagram @francescamittoni_
Instagram @francescamittoni_

There is a need for more normality and less perfection

Instead of aiming for physical perfection, maybe we should aim foracceptance, for self-improvement that does not affect health and does not lead to obsession. Above all, perhaps it is healthier and more constructive to seek your own well-being and balance without framing them in prepackaged models and stereotypes. Of course: today’s society so perpetually “exposed” makes anyone want to show their best to be accepted. I’approval seems the only way.

Instagram @francescamittoni_
Instagram @francescamittoni_

But it’s? It is here that the value ofsingularitywhich is also finding more and more space in social narratives: we show ourselves as we really are, including the so-called “defects”, which are nothing more than normalityfor. “Seeing some messages on social media helped me: if there were more messages of acceptance maybe things would have been a little different. confided Frances.

Source: Fan Page IT

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