Milan’s new museum: an underground cave connecting Etruscan art to Andy Wahrol and many others

Milan’s new museum: an underground cave connecting Etruscan art to Andy Wahrol and many others

In Milan, the new art museum of the Luigi Rovati Foundation was opened in a historic building in the heart of the city, a place of culture and artistic experimentation of rare beauty to be discovered.

Author: Clara Salzano

The new art museum of the Luigi Rovati Foundation

Another historic Milanese palace, in the heart of the city, has been returned to the citizens as the new art museum of the Luigi Rovati Foundation. The MCA – Mario Cucinella Architects studio took care of the architectural transformation of Palazzo di Corvo Venezia 52, which today opens up to the city as a place of culture, socialization and artistic experimentation of rare beauty.

The idea of ​​creating an innovative museum had been in the projects of the Luigi Rovati Foundation for years. Luigi Rovati was a physician, researcher and pharmaceutical entrepreneur, founder of the Rotta Research Laboratorium in Monza, one of the main Italian pharmaceutical multinationals, with great sensitivity to history, archeology and research. The museum that bears his name is not just an exhibition space, but a place of activity and wide-ranging views.

Luigi Ontani at the Luigi Rovati Foundation Art Museum
Luigi Ontani at the Luigi Rovati Foundation Art Museum

The Museum is located in the building built in 1871 by the Prince of Piombino opposite the gardens of via Palestro. The building became the property of Giuseppina Rizzoli in 1958, who underwent a significant renovation by the two architects Ferdinando Reggiori and Filippo Perego. Long uninhabited, in 2016 the building was acquired by the Foundation to create a modern museum space, based on a project by architect Mario Cucinella. The contemporary intervention managed to expand the basement floors creating an evocative underground exhibition floor. The exhibition itinerary continues on the Palazzo’s noble floor, where the rooms become true talking works of art. The Foundation’s precious collection includes Etruscan objects and is in dialogue with artists and works from different eras, from Lucio Fontana to Andy Wahrol and Luigi Ontani. be seen.

A post shared by the Luigi Rovati Foundation (@fondazioneluigirovati)

Source: Fan Page IT

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